Dracil’s BlogJournal

July 1, 2008

Analysis of keeper photos

This was an interesting exercise.  Using yesterday’s SF Pride pictures, I broke it down in terms of f-stop and shutter speed and then looked at the number of pictures I kept and threw away at each setting.  Here’s the ratio of keepers to pics taken.

F-stops:
f/4.5 – 1/1
f/5 – 5/8
f/5.6 – 36/59
f/6.3 – 18/47
f/7.1 – 69/84
f/8 – 137/160
f/9 – 34/40
f/10 – 9/13
f/11 – 1/2
f/29 – 1/3
f/32 – 1/3

Shutter speeds:
1/500 – 21/30
1/400 – 67/81
1/320 – 55/70
1/250 – 121/150
1/200 – 29/39
1/160 – 7/20
1/125 – 6/9
1/100 – 3/5
1/80 – 1/1
1/15 – 1/1
1/13 – 1/1
1/8 – 0/4

Data may be kinda screwy though since I spent most of the day overexposing on purpose even though I eventually ended up restoring them back to normal exposure (yay RAW and also that’ll teach me to rely on just looking at the picture on the LCD instead of using the histogram/blinkies).

But from the data, it does seem that for the Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS lens, from f/7 to f/9 has the best keeper rate, which is probably where the images are sharpest.  f/8 is probably a good setting to use.  For shutter speed, I think it’s not particularly surprising that the fast shutter speeds tend to be best since movement is minimized (since I was on a tripod, this would be mostly subject movement).  The really small aperture/slow shutter speeds is from the zooming effect experimentation.  It turns out that F/13 or around that is pretty good.  You can see a bit of blur, but it’s not overdone.

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